Site Content

image43

Where do the rescue dogs come from?

Most of our rescued dogs come from Texas animal shelters, small rural county animal control facilities that were strays or that have been abandoned or dumped off to fend for themselves.   All animal shelters that we accept dogs from are high kill shelters.  We are their lifeline to live a wonderful life.   We occasionally will accept a direct owners surrender that is no longer or willing to care for them.  All dogs are evaluated for health, temperament and level of training before being accepted into our program.  Dogs we rescue from South Texas are coordinated with a transporter to DFW then taken to our local veterinarn and then off to a foster home until fully vetted and ready to find their adoptive homes.  

Why should I adopt instead of buying from a breeder?

Most of our rescued dogs come from Texas animal shelters, small rural county animal control facilities that were strays or that have been abandoned or dumped off to fend for themselves.   All animal shelters that we accept dogs from are high kill shelters.  We are their lifeline to live a wonderful life.   We occasionally will accept a direct owners surrender that is no longer or willing to care for them.  All dogs are evaluated for health, temperament and level of training before being accepted into our program.  Dogs we rescue from South Texas are coordinated with a transporter to DFW then taken to our local veterinarn and then off to a foster home until fully vetted and ready to find their adoptive homes.  

If I am fostering a dog can I adopt that dog?

Yes, we do understand that when a connection is made between the dog and the human that it’s a wonderful bond and we require an adoption fee and signed adoption contract as with any other adopter. We hate to lose foster homes due to the adoption and ask if you adopt would you be willing to help another dog in need?

Medical Educational Resources

image44

Why should I vaccinate my dog/puppy?

Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) is a highly contagious and very deadly virus that is the highest threat to a dogs survival. Distemper is spread via airborne and droplet contamination both direct and indirect contact via the respiratory tract. Many forms of wildlife carry this disease and can easily pass it along to your beloved dogs. Most common carriers are Raccoons, opossums, foxes and coyotes. The best protection is to vaccinate your puppies with 3-4 rounds, 3 weeks apart.  Adults need annual boosters.


Parvo virus is also a highly contagious deadly virus that is contracted by direct contact with an infected dog or indirectly by oral-fecal route. Parvo virus (CPV) is a gastro-intestinal virus that causes nausea, vomiting and severe diarrhea often times bloody and has a horrible smell. Parvo virus can kill an entire litter of puppies and is very costly to treat. Puppies should be should be vaccinated per your veterinarian protocol typically starting at 6-8 weeks of age and will require 3-4 rounds; 3 weeks apart then annual booster.


Leptosporisis is a bacterial infection that can affect the entire dogs bodily systems including liver, kidneys and central nervous system, eyes and reproductive systems. It can be deadly if left untreated but treatment is typically IV fluids, antibiotics and possibly anti-emetics. Leptosporisis lives in stagnant water, ponds, lakes, creeks, muddy areas, in heavily wooded areas as well as areas where a infected animal has urinated.. If you have an active dog that enjoys swimming, camping and running or hunting its especially important to vaccinate them for Leptosporisis annually.


Canine Bordetella aka Kennel Cough is a highly contagious upper respiratory infection that causes canine infectious tracheobronchitis. The dog will begin to have a runny nose and have a dry, hacking cough sounding like a honking noise. Its very similar to a human with a bad bronchitis and/or cold. If left untreated it can turn into pneumonia and be deadly. Its treated with several weeks of antibiotis prescribed by a veterinarian. If you board your dog, foster dogs, attend doggie daycare, go to dog parks its best to have your dog vaccinated every 6 months to protect them from this disease.


Canine Influenza (dog flu) is on the rise in the past few years.  Its a highly contagious viral infection both dogs and cats via airborne (coughing, barking and sneezing, shared water bowls, leashes, collars).  Symptoms are severe upper respiratory infection including coughing for 10-21 days, nasal and ocular discharge and fever 104-105 degrees F).  There is a vaccine available and it is  recommend that be given especially to dogs that are boarded, dog parks, doggie daycare environments.  Vaccines are given annually by your veterinarian.  


Rabies is a deadly virus that attacks the dogs central nervous system including the brain and spinal cord. Dogs that are not protected from Rabies are at risk of contracting the virus if the dog is bitten by an infected animal. Animals that carry rabies are Racoons, opossoms, coyotes, foxes, skunks and bats. It is required by law that all dogs be vaccinated against Rabies by either the 1yr or 3yr vaccination to protect them from this deadly virus.

What is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworm disease is a non-contagious disease that is fatal if left untreated in dogs. Heartworms are caused by mosquitos. The infected mosquito bites the dog and injects a bacteria called Micro-filaria into the dogs bloodstream. The bacteria migrate to the dogs heart where it grows and develops into adult (1ft long) heartworms. Adult heartworms they reproduce over time which ultimately causes heart failure and multi-organ failure and death

If my dog gets Heartworm, can it be treated?

The treatment for heartworms is long and painful process.  Dogs should be tested on their annual exam by your veterinarian, even if they have been on prevention.  Heartworm positive dogs are tested by a quick blood test done in your veterinarians office.  We highly recommend that you ask your vet for a 4DX test as it also tests for deadly tick borne diseases as well as heartworm disease.  Your veterinarian will most likely put your dog on prednisone and start them on 30 days of Doxycycline which kills the baby heartworms and sterilizes the adult females.  This is an important part of treatment to stop the progression of the disease.  Your vet may also start them on an Ivermectin based heartworm preventative to stop any new disease infections.  To treat a dog for heartworm disease can range from $600-2,000 depending on the size of the dog and the severity of the disease.  This is where a $10/month heartworm pill is way more cost effective.


After the 30 days of pre-treatment, the dog will then get 1 Immiticide (arsenic based) injection deep in their back muscle. Typically the dogs spends the night and will be given pain medication or laser therapy as the injection is extremely painful.  The dog will go home with pain medication and most likely stay on the prednisone for another 30 days then your veterinarian will have you bring in your dog to get the 2nd and 3rd injections, 24hrs apart.  They will stay at the vet for 1-2 days to be closely monitored.  When you dog is back home with you it is critical that they are kept extremely calm, quiet or crated.   They canot be exercised at all including walks.  Its critical that their heartrate stay as low as possible as the worms are dieing inside their heart.  They can only go outside on a leash in the yard to potty and back inside.  


As they are recovering from treatment, always watch for lethargy, shortness of breat at rest, coughing up blood or frothy sputum as this is a medical emergency.  As the worms that are approximately 1ft long are dieing they become more active and the dog could very easily develop a worm clot in their lungs which is again why its so critical to keep the dog calm and quiet during this recovery period.


When you dog has fully recovered 30 days post 3rd injection you should keep your dogs on monthly prevention to prevent reinfection.



How can I protect my dog from getting Heartworm Disease?

Have your dog 4DX tested for heartworms annually and if he is negative have your vet prescribe a monthly heartworm preventative.  There are many options including a 6 month injection (Prohart); Heartgard, Trihart, Iverhart, Advantage Multi,  Revolution, Sentinel, Interceptor and Trifexis.  Several brands also will protect your pet against intestinal parasites and fleas and ticks so we recommend you consult with your veterinarian on choice that is best for your dog. If you give your dog a pill or topical form we recommend that you give the the prevention on the 1st of each month.  It's easier to remember, you can put an alert in your smart phone and on your calendar.  There are several brands to choose and some will also cover intestinal parasites and fleas and ticks so we recommend you consult with your veterinarian on choice that is best for your dog.  Heartworm prevention should be given 12 months of the year.  


Note:  It is still recommended that your pet be tested annually even if they are on prevention.

Tick Borne Diseases

We are seeing a high incidence of tick borne diseases in dogs which left untreated can be fatal.  It is extremely important to keep your pets on flea/tick medications to prevent them from getting a bite from an infected tick.   Here are the most common tick borne diseases.  


Canine Erlichia is also known as Canine Rickettsiosis, canine hemorrhagic fever, canine typhus is transmitted when an infected brown dog tick bites a dog and the Erlichia bacteria will take up to 3 weeks to start showing symptoms due to the infection that the dog is unable to fight off on their own. Because this is a bacterial infection there is no vaccine to prevent just monthly flea/tick prevention.

Symptoms include:  

  • Fever
  • lethargy
  • poor appetite
  • lymph node enlargement
  • abnormal bruising and bleeding (gums, bruising on abdomen, nose bleeding, coughing up blood, vomiting blood or bloody diarrhea)
  • chronic eye inflammation 
  • neurologic abnormalities
  • unsteady gate or lameness

Diagnosis is a simple 4DX blood test in your veterinarians office and treatment is a 30 day regimen of antibiotics typically Doxycycline.  If caught and treated in early stages you dog will easily recover but if caught in late stages this is frequently fatal.  Your veterinarian may request to do full bloodwork to see how advanced the infection is and if the dog may need any blood products transfused. 


Anaplasmosis is very similar to Erlichia in that it is also a bacterial infection from a bite of an infected Brown Dog Tick.  Symptoms may be subtle but can start to show in your dog within 2-3 weeks after infected.  This infection affects the dogs platelets and ability for their blood to clot.  Because this is a bacterial infection there is no vaccine to prevent just monthly flea/tick prevention.  The primary symptoms of Anaplasmosis is:

  • fever
  • Lethargy
  • lack of appetite
  • bruising (gums, blotchy red bruises on abdomen, nose bleeds, coughing up blood or even bloody diarrhea or vomiting.

Diagnosis is a simple 4DX blood test in your veterinarians office and treatment is a 30 day regimen of antibiotics typically Doxycycline.  If caught and treated in early stages you dog will easily recover but if caught in late stages this is frequently fatal.Your veterinarian may request to do full bloodwork to see how advanced the infection is or if they will need any blood replacement products.


Lyme disease in dogs is the most common tick borne disease.  This infection is transmitted to dogs by an infected Deer tick that is attached to your dog for at least 48hrs.  Dogs typically show symptoms in a few weeks after being bitten by the tick.  There is currently a Lyme vaccine available that can be given but your veterinarian.  This infection can cause the following symptoms:

  • Stiff gait and arched back due to joint pain
  • kidney issues
  • sensitivity to touch
  • difficulty breathing
  • fever
  • lack of appetite
  • depression or lethargy
  • superficial lymph nodes may be inflamed 

Diagnosis is a simple 4DX blood test in your veterinarians office and treatment is a 30 day regimen of antibiotics typically Doxycycline and pain medications.   If caught and treated in early stages you dog will easily recover but if caught in late stages this is frequently fatal.  Your veterinarian may request to do full bloodwork to see how advanced the infection is.


Babesiosis is another tick borne (deer or black legged tick) pathogen that is a protozoal parasite.  A dog can start to show symptoms in about 2 weeks after being bitten by an infected tick. Often times the symptoms are so mild they may go unnoticed for months or years.   The parasite attacks the dogs red blood cells which results in anemia and jaundice. This is most common in highly wooded areas where dogs spend most of their time outside and during peak season (May thru September).  The typical symptoms are the following:

  • lethargy
  • fever
  • pale gums
  • enlarged abdomen (ascites)
  • dark colored urine
  • jaundice skin (yellow or orange skin, gums and eyes)
  • weight loss 
  • discolored stool.

Diagnosis is a simple blood smear test in your veterinarians office and treatment is a 30 day regimen of antibiotics typically Clindamycin.  The prognosis for a dog with babesiosis is guarded and often fatal.  You need to be aware that some dogs have survived this infection but can always have some level of infection in their system.  Because this is a protozoal infection there is no vaccine at this time for this disease.


***  Please keep your dogs on monthly flea/tick medications to prevent tick borne diseases ***